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Man allegedly stole jewelry from Clifton Park home after posing as water authority worker

Man allegedly stole jewelry from Clifton Park home after posing as water authority worker

State police said today that a man who pretended to be a Clifton Park Water Authority employee on Tu

State police said today that a man who pretended to be a Clifton Park Water Authority employee on Tuesday to get into a woman's home may have stolen jewelry.

Police described the man they are seeking as white, possibly of Italian or Cuban descent, about 5-foot-7 and slim with a beard. He wore blue jeans and a light-colored jacket and dark baseball cap. Police say he also wore photo identification around his neck and had a radio into which he spoke.

The alleged victim, a 90-year-old woman, is on a well and doesn't get public water. Police said the man came to her back door at 10 a.m. Tuesday and said he needed to flush her water because it might be contaminated.

She let him into her home, where he stayed about 45 minutes, flushing toilets and running faucets.

But she didn't watch him the whole time. She later left the house, and when she returned she discovered some jewelry was missing and that her home had been burglarized while she was gone, police said.

People in the area on Route 146 told police they saw an older-model navy blue pickup truck with yellow lettering on the doors that may have included the word "water." The truck had two occupants: one who was seen knocking on a house door and one who stayed in the truck.

State police seek information about that truck and the man, and ask anyone else who saw it to call the Clifton Park barracks at 383-8583 or the 24-hour dispatch line at 583-7000.

On Tuesday, the Clifton Park Water Authority warned residents to be aware of whether someone is actually a water department employee before letting someone in the house, saying workers drive trucks and wear uniforms with the water authority logo and name and carry photo identification that says they work for the water authority.

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